Word Insanity


Dear English-B Interpreter Friends,

(First, my short letter to you to using words from Post #3)

Though my schedule (i.e. the fact that I need to deliver translations urgently) is steadfast in its attempt to stymie my commitment to bringing you these posts, I doggedly persevere. This takes more time than one might imagine. Choosing five worthy words and then spotting a single word or phrase in two videos that lead to the week’s big booth words beleaguers my patience and makes me question my sanity. I worry that I am devoting too much time to this and not to my more immediate tasks. Yet, despite the negative short-term consequences (e.g. lost sleep because I have not extended my translation delivery times), I forge unflinchingly ahead. The truth is I find these little weekly posts provide me a welcome dose of geeky challenge (yes, I have an admitted word addiction I am not willing to quit). Finding fresh articles about the myriad topics I (we) encounter in the booth forces me not to fall into the common habit of cursory readings. And reviewing video after video after video heightens my sensitivity to the many ways I can observe, accept and question the role of individual words in shaping my (and our) performance in the booth. As they certainly are for me, may these posts be a harbinger of ever increasing booth conscientiousness for all.

Suggestions always welcome. Forwarding and sharing encouraged.

Happy words,
Melissa

*** FIVE WORDS (IN CONTEXT) TO BRING INTO THE BOOTH ***
JEOPARDIZE
* As used in the title and body of this Reuters article about negotiations between North and South Korea (#geopolitics)
* As an interpreting opportunity from a news story about the rains and harvest in Minas Gerais in Portuguese
ref. “tem provocado todos esses efeitos na lavoura” (0:35) – since the effects are all negative.
EGREGIOUS
* As used in the body of this Eu Observer article about the German Court taking issue with the European Central Bank’s Outright Monetary Transactions program (#banking, #monetarypolicy)
* As an interpreting opportunity from a news story about the missing students in Mexico in Spanish
ref. “Peña Nieto calificó estos actos indignantes” (1:11)
REDOLENT
* As used in the body of this New York Times article about how olfactory receptors have functions and provide benefits far beyond our sense of smell (#science, #health)
GARNER
* As used in the body of this Deutsche Welle article about one of the top players in the “sharing economy” (#tourism, #economy, #entrepreneurship, #sociology, #IT)
SNARKY
* As used in the first paragraph of this New York Times movie review about “Dear White People” (#sociology, #art, #film)
{cameo appearance = solipsistic, one of our Post #1 words}

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